House Cricket

What do house crickets look like?

  • Yellowish-brown or straw-colored with three dark bands across the top of their head.
  • Size: 3/4 to 7/8 inch long.
  • Long, slender antennae (that are much longer than their body).
  • Wings on adult crickets lay flat on the back and are bent down on the sides.
  • Adult females have a long slender, tube-like structure (ovipositor) projecting from their abdomen that they use to lay eggs.
  • Nymphs look similar to adults—but are smaller with less developed wings.

What are the habits of house crickets?

  • On the exterior, females can lay an average of 728 eggs in/around protected areas.
  • Eggs overwinter and hatch in late spring producing nymphs that reach the adult stage by late summer and there is only a single generation per year.
  • On the interior of structures, females lay far fewer eggs—104 within cracks and crevices and other secluded areas (such as behind baseboards or mouldings) and newly hatched nymphs complete their development in just under 60 days.  
  • The entire life cycle of house crickets can be completed indoors and they can live their entire adult life indoors. 
  • Despite their ability to survive indoors, they prefer to live on the exterior particularly during warm weather.  
  • They are attracted to exterior lights—often by the hundreds or thousands.

What kind of damage is caused by field crickets?

  • House crickets may chew on furniture, rugs, clothing and other items.  
  • Unlike many pests, house crickets will also chew on synthetic fabric as well as naturally occurring materials. 
  • The high-pitched chirping of adult males is irritating to many individuals.

What should I look for?

  • Habitats such as moist harborages e.g., wood piles, landscape timbers, stones or rocks.
  • Droppings which physically look like large pieces of pepper.
  • Obvious damage to materials such as carpets, fabrics, etc… inside the home.

How do I control and kill field crickets?

  • Moist harborages, such as wood piles, rotten landscape timbers, stones, rocks, etc., should be removed or placed away from properties.
  • Yards should be well-maintained, e.g., frequently mowed, weeds should be kept to a minimum, and flower beds should not be over mulched.
  • Exclusion or sealing of entry points into buildings should be prevented by caulking gaps around siding, windows, doors, pipes, wires, etc.
  • Yellow bug-lights or sodium vapor lighting can replace existing outside lighting to avoid attracting crickets to doors or windows.
  • For indoor populations, a vacuum should be used to remove visibly accessible crickets.

How do I control and kill field crickets?

  • Moist harborages, such as wood piles, rotten landscape timbers, stones, rocks, etc., should be removed or placed away from properties.
  • Yards should be well-maintained, e.g., frequently mowed, weeds should be kept to a minimum, and flower beds should not be over mulched.
  • Exclusion or sealing of entry points into buildings should be prevented by caulking gaps around siding, windows, doors, pipes, wires, etc.
  • Yellow bug-lights or sodium vapor lighting can replace existing outside lighting to avoid attracting crickets to doors or windows.
  • For indoor populations, a vacuum should be used to remove visibly accessible crickets.